Getting Down To Basics with Tips

How to Curb Bad Dog Behavior

Most seasoned dog owners are aware of the common dog behavior issues, however, new ones may puzzle over why dogs display these behaviors. Several of the usual dog behaviors that are frequently misunderstood and mishandled by dog owners are: barking, biting, chewing and a lot more. If you are new to having canines, thinking about getting a dog, or would prefer to better deal with your dog’s behavior problems, keep in mind that carefully understanding the most typical dog behavior problems is the most essential step to solving and preventing them. You can also think about professional obedience training if you want to be able to speedily prevent or better control your dog’s behavior issues.

If destructive behavior is not rectified quickly then it can lead to considerable destruction of your personal property, medical issues in your puppy, and the slight destruction of the human-animal bond. Here are a few of the most important things that you need to know about curbing bad dog habits.

Correcting your dog’s undesirable behavior should be a long-term objective, nonetheless, the first step in this direction is to make the present behavior stop. A great way to make this happen is to divest your canine companion of any stimulus to go on with its undesirable behavior. For example, if your dog barks by your door when it wants to leave the house to play, and you frequently open the door to let it out, it is a form of reward for your dog’s barking. To improve this behavior, you can try ignoring your dog when it barks and only let it out when it is able to sit at the door without a sound, even if it can only maintain this good behavior for a moment initially. A no pull dog harness can also prove to be beneficial.

Separation anxiety is the term employed by many veterinarians and trainers to allude to dogs who go nuts without any human attention, attempting to wreck anything in their vicinity, barking and crying wildly, and otherwise bring about chaos. To prevent this reaction, ensure that you give your dog time to adapt to your activities by beginning small and ensuring that the experience is a terrific one. Without generating a big fuss over it, try to leave your home. Set your dog in his crate or a confinement room with his fave chew toy, ensure that there is relaxing music on, and then, pick up your things and go out the door. Walk around the house quietly, and pay attention to what your dog is doing without alerting him to your presence. Give him several minutes, depending on what his behavior is when you leave. If he does get anxious, make sure that he has some time to settle down.